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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

 Landlords meeting need for longer tenancies, says RLA

The latest official figures show landlords are meeting the growing need for longer tenancies in private rented housing.
 
New Government figures show that whilst the proportion of children in rental housing has increased, so has the average length of residence in such homes. 
 
According to the English Housing Survey for 2014-15, over the past 10 years the proportion of private rented households with dependent children has increased from 30% in 2004-05 to 37% in 2014-15. 
 
Related to this is the trend for the average length of residence for private sector tenants in their homes increasing to four years. This is up from three-and-a-half years last year and a new five-year high.
 
The survey notes again that those living in private rented housing for a longer period generally paid less rent. 

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) today that these figures show that landlords are already stepping up to the plate and meeting the need for longer tenancies for families.  
 
The RLA is pressing the Government to remove barriers to longer term tenancies, including restrictions imposed on landlords by lenders and by freeholders of leases.
 
RLA chairman Alan Ward said: “Today’s survey confirms what we have long known. Landlords do not spend their time looking for opportunities to evict a tenant. It’s time to end the scaremongering on this.
 
“More can be done to help landlords offer longer term tenancies without the need for compulsory three or five year tenancies. We are calling on the Government to use the Housing and Planning Bill to remove barriers preventing landlords from offering longer tenancies, including mortgage and leasehold conditions that may prevent this.”
 
“Notable increases in the average length of time tenants stay in a private rented property show the system already enables longer tenancies that so many are calling for. Landlords are already meeting tenants’ requirements and there is no need heavy handed legislation that would disrupt supply of badly-needed accommodation.”

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