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Performers at Edinburgh Fringe struggle to find a place to stay

A number of performers at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, which is currently taking place, are struggling to find short-term accommodation in the city, which comes as no surprise to the National Landlords Association (NLA).

Last year, the NLA pointed out that more landlords north of the border were selling than buying on the back of the introduction of the introduction of the Scottish Private Residential Tenancy (PRT) in 2017.

The organisation warned that this would lead to artists, who have traditionally relied on renting student flats during the university summer break, struggling to find accommodation during festival season.

At the time, Richard Lambert, CEO of the NLA explained that the PRT removed the flexibility of the sector to meet the varied needs of renters, particularly students and those seeking short-term tenancies.

The Scottish government’s decision to make student tenancies open-ended, rather than give an exemption linking them to the academic year, so landlords could not risk advertising them unless the tenants had confirmed they were leaving, has backfired.

As the NLA anticipated, many students only did this in May, putting pressure on both the Fringe and on students looking for accommodation for the next academic year.

With the importance of the festival and the Fringe to Edinburgh and the influx of people requiring shorter tenancies, the NLA believes the Scottish government should look again at a student exemption to the PRT to prevent this shortage in accommodation next year.

Lambert commented: “It’s too late to do anything around the situation in Edinburgh for this year. We predicted that performers would struggle to find place to stay following these changes.

“Because student landlords don’t know if or when their properties will be available, they’re unable to advertise their properties for the Fringe in time. If this continues year-on-year, low-income and lesser known artists will struggle to find short-term accommodation, significantly reducing the variety of the acts.

“Rents are being pushed up in the student market for the same reason, because there are fewer properties coming onto the market. Students don’t want or need indefinite tenancies, so they would lose nothing from an exemption, but would gain from the return of a stable market.”

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    The SNP were warned of the consequences of not exempting student properties from the crazy prt legislation. This year many students had to take on new flats from 1st June because the final year students left on 31 May or earlier and landlords with nice properties could dictate the entry (but not leaving) dates. Many therefore were paying for two flats for 28 days in June if they hadn't given notice in time. Fixed lease terms are ideal for students and the prt "freedoms" do them no favours. Of course the SNP can't understand the economics of this or they wouldn't be advocating independence, which would be an even bigger economic disaster!

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    The SNP were warned of the consequences of not exempting student properties from the crazy prt legislation. This year many students had to take on new flats from 1st June because the final year students left on 31 May or earlier and landlords with nice properties could dictate the entry (but not leaving) dates. Many therefore were paying for two flats for 28 days in June if they hadn't given notice in time. Fixed lease terms are ideal for students and the prt "freedoms" do them no favours. Of course the SNP can't understand the economics of this or they wouldn't be advocating independence, which would be an even bigger economic disaster!

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    They sound crazy the SNPs don’t pay a lot of attention being from north west of England but read on here and it just baffles me

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