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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Landlords to face fines of up to £30,000 if they fail to comply with new regulations

New regulation introduced yesterday could see unscrupulous landlords fined up to £30,000 if they do not comply with the rules. 

Under the Electrical Safety Standards in the Private Rented Sector (England) Regulations 2020, landlords must now get wiring, light fittings, plug sockets and other electrical installations in renters’ homes checked at least every five years by a “qualified and competent” person.

The new rules are designed to strengthen electrical safety practices and bring in line with those already well-established within gas safety regulations in private residential tenancies have been introduced. 

The London Fire Brigade’s deputy assistant commissioner for fire safety, Charlie Pugsley, said: “We are very pleased to see these new regulations come into force, which should be seen as a huge win for tenants who often have to battle with landlords to ensure their homes are safe. 

“Most landlords provide well-maintained and safe accommodation for their tenants, but there are those that don’t and put people’s lives at risk. So it’s a positive step that tenants now have protection and the support of local authorities if landlords don’t comply.

“Sadly, we are all too aware of what the devastating consequences of faulty electrics can be and provided detailed data to the working group to shape the guidance.

“As these regulations do not cover electrical appliances, only fixed electrical installations, we would urge people to ensure their appliances are safe and always register them so you can be informed if there is a fault identified.”

 

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    Can anyone define “qualified and competent” especially in terms of qualifications

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    Competent would be some one able to do the job, where as qualified would be someone who has trained to do the job, ie I expect you could change the oil in your car, where as a mechanic has been trained to do that job. A student could come out of uni with a law degree, doesn't mean he is able to do that job he just has a piece of paper saying he has done the course

     
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    complete bollox--more eu regs--will achieve nothing useful but add costs--and unscrupulous cowboys will recommend work that is not needed

    boris is a remainer and a conman

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    Agreed, that's exactly what will happen, but I have a good electrician who I have been using for more than 10 yrs now that I trust, same with the guy that MOTs my cars been using him for more than 20 yrs, better the devil you know than the devil you don't.

     
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    Can anyone advise whether under the new EICR rules, if an AST expired on 1 May and became a periodic statutory agreement, does an EICR need to be done now or can it wait until 1 Apr 2021? All advice seems to refer to 'new tenancies' - are they defined as new tenants? Do they include existing tenants who renew for another 12 months? Thanks.

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    That is an interesting one, personally the way I see it they are existing tenants and can wait until 1 April 21 but others have told me otherwise .

     
    Matthew Payne

    Hi, if the tenancy rolled into an SP in May they cant have renewed for another 12 months, its either a new fixed term or a SP. Unless thats a 2nd Q. Either way, the change happened before 1st June so you can wait up until April. On a general point, as I understand it from what I have read, as far as these regs go, a tenancy ends when a fixed term ends, so if from now a SP starts at the end of a fixed term or a fixed term renewal takes place, thats a new tenancy and the 28 day clock has started ticking.

     
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    Thanks Andrew. The letting agent insists we need one done now, of course.

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    Thanks Matthew. Yes, it was a second Q! I have heard other landlords say that tenanted properties can wait until April, it's only new tenants that require the EICR before that date. Quite confusing!

    Matthew Payne

    Best way to explain it is ignore people, its paperwork. A new tenancy is a new SP or a new renewed fixed period or a set of brand new set of tenants after 1st June. All new, EICR required.

     
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    Great, that helps clarify things, thank you. Wouldn't it be good if official guidance from was more clearly worded.

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