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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Goodlord welcomes ‘essential clarity’ on latest evictions update

The government’s latest changes to the eviction ban have been welcomed by property technology company Goodlord. 

The government revealed yet more changes to notice periods last Friday, which took effect over the weekend, and they include the need to give tenants who have committed anti-social behaviour just four weeks’ notice of their intention to repossess a property. 

Those who have committed acts of domestic violence will only need to be given two weeks’ notice.

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In cases of tenant rent arrears, landlords will now only be required to give four weeks’ notice where a tenant has built six months of arrears.

 

Where tenants are required to vacate property as a result of failed follow up Right to Rent checks, 12 weeks notice will be necessary. 

Oli Sherlock, head of insurance at Goodlord, said: "This afternoon's update is a welcome step forward from the government and offers landlords some of the clarity they’ve been calling for after a week of silence following the eviction ban extension. There’ll be relief that the new rules won’t be applied retrospectively; meaning any landlord or agents already in the process of an eviction under the previous regulations won’t be disadvantaged and can move proceedings forwards. 

“It’s also encouraging to see new rules designed to differentiate well-intentioned tenants - those who are willing to collaborate on payment plans and are maintaining strong dialogue with their landlords - from those being evicted for anti-social behaviour or who present other risks. 

“These changes are therefore moving things in the right direction by recognising the spectrum of challenges landlords and agents are grappling with and offering some crucial clarity. 

“With the above in mind, it is now crucial the government confirms that courts will reopen on the 20th September, without any further arbitrary extensions on the stay, and that they are ready to cope with the backlog of hearings. Otherwise they will only compound what is a rapidly escalating issue.”

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