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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Significant fall in rent and living costs in London

London has seen the second-largest decline in rent and living costs in Europe over the past three years when it comes to a percentage of salary, new research from Spotahome shows. 

The study by the international rental marketplace reveals that Londoners have enjoyed one of the most notable increases in ‘livability’ where the cost of renting and living as a percentage of salary is concerned.  

Spotahome analysed data on the basic costs of living across 27 European capitals, including rent, internet, utilities, gym and fitness club memberships, shopping essentials and public transport.

Spotahome then looked at what percentage of the average net monthly salary this total cost of living accounted for in each city and how this has changed in the last three years.  

The research found that Warsaw, Lisbon and Budapest are home to the highest costs of living at present, with these total costs accounting for between 92% and 96% of the average monthly income.  

Zagreb, Prague, Athens, Rome, Dublin, Riga and Bucharest also ranked high in terms of the cost of living as a percentage of monthly earnings.

With the essential cost of living accounting for less than half - 47% - of the average monthly wage, Helsinki is one of the most affordable cities for renters.  

London sits mid-table, with 76% of the average monthly wage required to cover the necessary costs of living.

The decline in London over the last three years is primarily driven by positive wage growth.

In 2017, 89% of the average monthly wage in London was required to cover the basic cost of living; however, this has fallen by 13% today.  

Only Vilnius has seen a more considerable decline. The cost of living now also accounts for 76% of the monthly wage, down -18%  from 94% in 2017.

Riga, Tallinn, Bratislava, Bucharest, Berling, Amsterdam, Budapest, Luxembourg City, Helsinki, Athens, Brussels, Vienna and Copenhagen have all also seen the cost of living as a percentage of monthly income decline between 1% and 11%.  

Nadia Butt, UK and Ireland country manager of Spotahome, said: “We tend to see a lot of focus on the high cost of living in many major European cities which is driven mainly by the price of securing a rental property.

“However, the good news is that across many cities, the level of earnings required to cover this cost of living has actually declined over the last three years.

“This is primarily a result of consistent wage growth outstripping the increase in the cost of day to day outgoings and demonstrates why many are still keen to travel to foreign countries to further their professional careers.

“Not only can they earn more, but spending less of their monthly income on getting by means they have a much better chance of saving for future investments such as buying a house of their own.”

Nation

City

Rent and living costs as % of net salary (2017)

Rent and living costs as % of net salary (2020)

Change (2017-2020)

Lithuania

Vilnius

94%

76%

-18%

United Kingdom

London

89%

76%

-13%

Latvia

Riga

95%

84%

-11%

Estonia

Tallinn

77%

68%

-8%

Slovakia

Bratislava

85%

77%

-8%

Romania

Bucharest

88%

82%

-5%

Germany

Berlin

55%

50%

-5%

Netherlands

Amsterdam

72%

68%

-4%

Hungary

Budapest

96%

92%

-4%

Luxembourg

Luxembourg City

53%

50%

-3%

Finland

Helsinki

50%

47%

-3%

Greece

Athens

89%

86%

-3%

Belgium

Brussels

49%

48%

-2%

Austria

Vienna

57%

56%

-1%

Denmark

Copenhagen

54%

53%

-1%

France

Paris

59%

60%

1%

Bulgaria

Sofia

81%

82%

1%

Ireland

Dublin

82%

84%

2%

Portugal

Lisbon

91%

93%

3%

Sweden

Stockholm

58%

61%

3%

Slovenia

Ljubljana

74%

77%

4%

Croatia

Zagreb

85%

88%

4%

Czechia

Prague

83%

88%

5%

Cyprus

Nicosia

59%

65%

6%

Italy

Rome

80%

86%

6%

Poland

Warsaw

84%

96%

12%

Spain

Madrid

64%

79%

15%

Malta

Valletta

No data available

No data available

No data available

Source: Numbeo

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    Significant fall in rents & living costs in London. I agree it's Free.

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    • 07 September 2020 10:21 AM

    According to Sky News today it is expected that 70% of the 9 million currently furloughed workers will return to their jobs

    That means a few million won't.
    Some of these will be tenants who inevitably will have to claim UC.

    I guess the big question is whether their LL can survive on LHA rent?

    This they will need to do until they can source tenants paying market rents.
    I just don't see that as being easily achievable.

    Many LL will therefore be stuck with LHA rent for the foreseeable future.

    Rarely will it be worthwhile to undertake full time jobs and come off welfare
    Unfortunately for Govt many will realise that welfare provides a rather nice free lifestyle.
    Rarely will taking a crappy low wage job be worth coming off welfare for.
    Maybe just working 16 hrs pw provides for a far better lifestyle than working full time

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