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Suzy OShea
Suzy OShea
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About Me

my expertise in the industry

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Suzy OShea

From: Suzy OShea 19 August 2020 09:30 AM

Suzy OShea
Mark Wilson, My son was in student flats for three years and you are right that often the agents treat them badly: they fail to provide the most basic health and safety equipment such as smoke and carbon monoxide detectors; they leave repairs like missing grid panels covering bathroom pipes undone for ever, this allowing rodent infestations in the property: they don't stick to legal limits for sizes of rooms: worst of all there is no inclusion of a six-month break clause in any of their tenancy agreements, such as I and I'm sure every responsible landlord includes in their tenancy agreement, which would have allowed the tenant to quite legally give one month's notice in February/March and move out without legal threats and demands for lost rent. However, on the other side, financially students have been affected the least since they are supposed to be able to survive on the grants/loans provided from tax-payers' money for that purpose. Any money they earn from part time jobs which may have been lost is extraneous to this calculation! Going back home to live off Mum and Dad is therefore their choice and if their parents have stood as guarantors then the landlords ought to be able to collect the rent. If there is no clause in the contract about a force majeure altering the situation, like the damage of a hurricane or a fire having made the accommodation uninhabitable, then I don't see how this can be whistled up suddenly to justify the unjustifiable! If students or their parents win this case, they will be creating a rod for their own backs in the future, since many landlords will leave this niche market and refuse to take students. This will create future scarcity and ultimately drive up rents. Furthermore, are students who live 'in hall; i.e. in student accommodation provided by their universities allowed to skip their rental obligations? If they are not getting lectures, tutorials or the services and resources of student libraries are they allowed to refuse to pay tuition fees for the time of the lock down? I think you could be on a slippery slope here and the government had better set limits to its presumption on landlords' charity or else they and we the tax-payers will have even larger bills to face for the Corona virus bail outs. This government has already printed nearly £63 billion to cover the requirements of the current lock down which will shortly be lifted, though economic life will take some time to return to anything approaching normality. Now this pack of criminals wants to print nearly another £300 billion to fund further dislocation caused by brexit which will very conveniently be laid at the door of the Corona Virus. This is all fraudulent but I would expect no better from this pack of jackals!

From: Suzy OShea 26 May 2020 16:29 PM

Suzy OShea
what becomes difficult for elderly to budget for are the long-term increases in rent if they don't have generous pensions. We all know that the state pension is just soul food and would never cover rent as well as other living costs. Rents in retirement communities are higher because there are added services like wardens. yet buying in these communities also involves very high services charges for similar reasons. My advice if you have a large house that is too large for you to cope with, keep a spare room for a carer which you may well need and rent out a couple of rooms to defray future costs. Its a far better option than paying vast sums for retirement homes. Don't like the idea of 'sharing your home with strangers'. Well, what do you think you'll be doing in a retirement home where the dwellings are split into flats? if you get a bad neighbour, it can make your life miserable and you have absolutely no control. Keeping lodgers in your home who turn out to be noisy or anti-social, you can evict them in three weeks. most large houses could even have enough space to provide your own ground floor flat with bathrooms adapted for the elderly. Making the upper floor a shared rental space with a kitchen is not difficult. Employing a cleaner on a weekly basis for both premises means you retain ultimate control over what goes on in the shared rental space and can defray the cleaning costs of your own flat as part of the maintenance charges. if ever you came to sell your house, some tax would be due on the part used to generate income, but this is better than other alternatives.

From: Suzy OShea 16 January 2020 10:06 AM

Suzy OShea

From: Suzy OShea 21 November 2019 12:21 PM

Suzy OShea

From: Suzy OShea 03 July 2019 16:20 PM

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